Thursday, November 20, 2003

ANGELS (AND MORMONS) IN AMERICA: Andrew Sullivan has a take down here of recent crooning at the New York Times about HBOs forthcoming production of Tony Kurshner's Angels in America. Angles is a play that chronicles the AIDS epedemic in the 1980s, and won a Pulitzer Prize in the 1990s.

What is interesting to me is that the play has a Mormon character (to be played on HBO by Patrick Wilson) -- a closet homosexual -- who in one scene appears on stage in a homosexual encounter wearing temple garments. Kurchner clearly doesn't really know anything about Mormons or at least about temple garments. (Although he may have known how offensive Mormons would find such a staging.) His Mormon character utters some strange gibberish about the meaning of the garment that is suppose to sound very, uh, Mormon. For example he refers to the garment as "a second skin," an image that to my knowledge no Mormon has ever used in discussing the garment. Thus, Angels' Mormon is not a real Mormon, but a sort of stand-in stereotype for repressed religiously conservative sexuality. Mormons are kind of straight straight guy, if you will, and Angels plays off of this image by making its Mormon homosexual.

I don't know if HBO is planning on having the garment scene in their production. (I hope not.) However, it is interesting to see that Mormon stereotypes have come full circle. We started out in the 19th century as the ultimate boogey men of Victorian sexuality. By the close of the 20th century we are once again the sexual boogey men, although admittedly for a different kind of sexuality.